Confession of a dishaholic (part 4)

If you let a dish-aholic start collecting a set of blue and white dishes,

Confession #1: She will have to have other blue and white dishes to go with those she started out, and sink her love deeper and deeper and yet even deeper in the blue and white pile of dishes there are out there…

Confession #2: Then, she will think she needs to start collections of other dishes to balance out the blue/white monopoly in her cupboards…

Confession #3: Then, she will want to collect pieces for her silverware chest, piece by piece…

Confession #4: Then, she will have to have serving pieces to go with her silver ware…

platters (what a surprise, she would have blue/white transferware platters!)

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passover platter

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gravy boats

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— pitchers and other tea-related thingamagigs!

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— chargers

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— bowls (big bowls, small bowls, shaped bowls, leaf bowls!)

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— and of course, pyrex and pie-PALS!

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— and this!

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If you are inflicted with the same weakness as I am, I would love to know what serving pieces in your stash you use the most!

Thank you for stopping by and humoring me while I confess. I hope you have a fun-filled day!

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Confession of a dishaholic (part 2)

If you let a dish-aholic start collecting a set of blue and white dishes,

Confession #1: She will have to have other blue and white dishes to go with those she started out, and sink her love deeper and deeper and yet even deeper in the blue and white pile of dishes there are out there…

Confession #2: Then, she will think she needs to start collections of  other dishes to balance out the blue/white monopoly in her cupboards…

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(to suit the different seasons, don’t you know?) :)

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Christmas Tablescape2

Thank you for visiting.  I would love to hear from you if you are suffering from the aforementioned symptoms! :)  Have a great Friday, everyone.  I will see you next week!

A Thanksgiving Corner

I love using what I already have to come up with something different. This year, I am using this grape tray to display some corn and chocolates (those ears of corn are at least five years old, but they still look pretty good to me to throw away):

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I got this idea that I could display my Portuguese Majolica Grape Plates in stacked-pancake-style on this cake stand that just normally sits on my counter top empty:

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Thank you for visiting my little Thanksgiving Corner. Stay warm (for the Northern Hemispher-ers), and enjoy a lovely spring day (for the Southern Hemispher-ers)! :) Oh, and don’t forget to grab some chocolate before you go — if you like chocolates, that is! :)

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Dish-aholic Part 7: Old World Charm

Ellen had commented about my turkey platter in my “Turkey-scape” show-and-tell last week. I thought I would show you how it looks like without the “load”:

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It is made out of a “pewter”-looking propriety material. Here are some other pieces made of the same material that I use for serving purposes:

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I especially like using these serving pieces during Thanksgiving time because they hearken back to the bygone era of early America where pewterware was common to many. Following are some excerpts of pewter history in the Colonial time by The Pewter Collector’s Club of America:

“The history of pewter in America goes back to the early colonial period. Though pewter was then considered to be somewhat of a luxury item, it had made its appearance in Jamestown, Virginia by 1610, and in the New England area by the 1630s as newly arrived colonists brought pewter with them from their native England. At least five pewterers were active in the Massachusetts Bay Colony by 1640. These pewterers had trained in England under the strict auspices of The Worshipful Company of Pewterers, a powerful guild which so stringently regulated all aspects of the manufacture of pewter that English pewter was regarded as the finest made….

While the very poor used wooden utensils, most colonials who could afford it used pewter; and it came to be regarded as almost a symbol of gentility. Though pewter vessels cost only about one-tenth the price of silver, they were still fairly expensive since the cost of a dish or tankard equaled or exceeded what a skilled craftsman earned in a day….

More than 300 tons of English pewter were shipped to the American colonies annually in the 1760’s….

In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries American pewter was made by casting the molten metal in molds which were usually made of brass or bronze. Molds were very expensive and immigrating pewterers often brought their molds with them from England and Germany. However molds were produced in America as well. These would then be passed down from generation to generation of pewterers. One tankard required five separate molds, one each for the body, bottom, handle, cover, and thumbpiece. Showing great ingenuity, pewterers often used one mold for a variety of purposes..”

I will have some time next week to bring out more pieces to add to the Old World feel to my fall decorations. I hope to take some pictures then to show you… meanwhile, I’d better get back to work! Thank you for stopping by my show-and-tell. I hope you have a wonderful weekend!

The Timeless Acanthus

From Wikipedia — “The acanthus is one of the most common ornaments used to depict foliage. Architectural ornaments are carved in stone or wood in the appearance of leaves from the Mediterranean acanthus spinosus plant, with some resemblance to thistle, poppy and parsley leaves.”

The acanthus on a fireplace mantel:

The acanthus on carvings on china cabinets:

You can see, however, the acanthus motif is not limited to wood and stone that so commonly adorned the Corinthians columns or in architecture of the Medieval or Classical Renaissance periods. You find the motif on upholstered occasional chairs:

Acanthus on table serving pieces:

Acanthus on bedding linen:

Acanthus on the border of a Italian tapestry:

The acanthus is also found on wallpaper, draperies, stationery and many many other media. Timelessness is definitely an apt word to describe this beautiful ornamental motif, don’t you think?

An interesting side note on acanthus also found on Wikipedia:

The Acanthus is believed by some highly respected theological scholars to be the plant used by Roman soldiers to make the crown which was placed on the head of Jesus Christ when they mocked him by giving him a crown, scepter, and crown of Acanthus leaves. The Greek word for “thorn” and “acanthus” have the same genitive plural (akanthon), which is the word used in the Gospel of Matthew. As shown elsewhere here, the Acanthus is indigenous to the Mediterranean, and it was a iconic symbol of classical Greek architechture. Crowns during that time and region were made of wreaths or diadems.