A Thanksgiving Corner

I love using what I already have to come up with something different. This year, I am using this grape tray to display some corn and chocolates (those ears of corn are at least five years old, but they still look pretty good to me to throw away):

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I got this idea that I could display my Portuguese Majolica Grape Plates in stacked-pancake-style on this cake stand that just normally sits on my counter top empty:

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Thank you for visiting my little Thanksgiving Corner. Stay warm (for the Northern Hemispher-ers), and enjoy a lovely spring day (for the Southern Hemispher-ers)! :) Oh, and don’t forget to grab some chocolate before you go — if you like chocolates, that is! :)

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Wiesbaden Napkin Fold

Some of you have asked me to demonstrate how to do this napkin fold:

It is called the “Wiesbaden” because this napkin fold adorns many dining tables in the beautiful resort town of Wiesbaden, Germany (from Linda Hetzer’s The Simply Art of Napkin Folding).

[I find that for the best presentation, you would have to use quality linen that has a bit of a “body” and is not too “limp”, or else your folds won’t stand up as nicely. For the “real” thing, I also press and starch my linen before performing the fold. I also found that a larger fork (Continental size) works and looks best.]

First, fold the napkin in half diagonally to form a triangle:

Fold up the bottom edge about 1-1/2 inches:

From the center, fold three one-inch pleates and insert the pleats in between the tines of the fork. There you have it – Simple, simple, simple!! You may choose to display the napkin with or without that “front” fold depending on from which direction you insert the pleats between the tines:

I hope you have enjoyed this short tutorial, and that it has given you some ideas for your Thanksgiving presentation this year!

Have a great day, everyone!

Decorating with Cornucopia

History of Cornucopia excerpted from Wikipedia:

[The cornucopia (Latin: Cornu Copiae) is a symbol of food and abundance dating back to the 5th century BC, also referred to as horn ‘o’ plenty, Horn of Amalthea, and harvest cone

In modern depiction, the cornucopia is typically a hollow, horn-shaped wicker basket typically filled with various kinds of festive fruit and vegetables. In North America, the cornucopia has come to be associated with Thanksgiving and the harvest.]

I have given my cornucopia a slight twist – I filled it with a floral arrangement accented by berries and real pheasant feathers:

This cornucopia is one of my favorite pieces from the Spode Woodland collection. I have had it for quite a few years, and it sometimes stays as a regular fixture in my home decor even beyond the fall/winter seasons. Fall is my husband’s favorite season, and I am always anxious to try out fall things to make the season special for him. The only thing that I am really lacking is a fall-theme quilt — one of these days, I promise myself. :)

Thank you for looking at my cornucopia. I hope you have a bountiful day!