Blue & Brown Mix & Match

tablescape thursday

Inspired by my blue and brown quilt, I set out to play with my blue and brown dishes all together at one time.

leaves4

I am usually a dish collection kind of gal when it comes to dishes, but I have to say that experimenting with mixing the colors together was very fun! The following are some of the combinations I tried:

#1 (you can tell I was a bit reserved in the beginning!)

blue brown1

#2:

blue brown2

#3:

blue brown3

#4 (then ever so slowly, I started to loosen up):

blue brown4

blue brown5

#5 (I started to be a bit more adventurous):

blue brown6

#6 (By now, dishes were starting to pile up on the floor, waiting to be auditioned):

blue brown7

blue brown8

#7 (I am bringing in more blues):

blue brown9

blue brown10

#8 (now comes the desserts):

blue brown11

blue brown12

Now, how about retreating to the drawing room to take some tea with me?

blue brown13

blue brown14

What do you think, my bloggy friends – should I, or should I not use my blues with my browns this year for Thanksgiving?


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Confession of a dishaholic (part 4)

If you let a dish-aholic start collecting a set of blue and white dishes,

Confession #1: She will have to have other blue and white dishes to go with those she started out, and sink her love deeper and deeper and yet even deeper in the blue and white pile of dishes there are out there…

Confession #2: Then, she will think she needs to start collections of other dishes to balance out the blue/white monopoly in her cupboards…

Confession #3: Then, she will want to collect pieces for her silverware chest, piece by piece…

Confession #4: Then, she will have to have serving pieces to go with her silver ware…

platters (what a surprise, she would have blue/white transferware platters!)

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passover platter

plate3

armetale1

gravy boats

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— pitchers and other tea-related thingamagigs!

armetale2

Carlyle1

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— chargers

bao1

woodland4

— bowls (big bowls, small bowls, shaped bowls, leaf bowls!)

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armetale3

Spode Italian5

casserole5

— and of course, pyrex and pie-PALS!

casserole6

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— and this!

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If you are inflicted with the same weakness as I am, I would love to know what serving pieces in your stash you use the most!

Thank you for stopping by and humoring me while I confess. I hope you have a fun-filled day!

Confession of a dishaholic (part 2)

If you let a dish-aholic start collecting a set of blue and white dishes,

Confession #1: She will have to have other blue and white dishes to go with those she started out, and sink her love deeper and deeper and yet even deeper in the blue and white pile of dishes there are out there…

Confession #2: Then, she will think she needs to start collections of  other dishes to balance out the blue/white monopoly in her cupboards…

woodland7

woodland4

Thanksgiving Corner2

(to suit the different seasons, don’t you know?) :)

Carlyle1

Carlyle2

Christmas Tablescape2

Thank you for visiting.  I would love to hear from you if you are suffering from the aforementioned symptoms! :)  Have a great Friday, everyone.  I will see you next week!

Dish-aholic Part 6: Brown Beauty

I took some time off from quilting this afternoon to play with some breakables:

I started the Spode Woodland mixed with Delamere collection years ago (when the pieces were still crafted in England) for my husband because autumn is his favorite season. I think the game bird motif and the floral border make the perfect marriage combining the masculine and feminine tastes:

Well, some of the usual suspects refused to be left out…

Now that playtime is over (time to get back to quilting), how about some tea before you leave for the other show-and-tell? It rained here yesterday, and it’s been cold today. A hot tea would do me good before I head back to the sewing dungeon…

Don’t be bashful – I have plenty more cups and mugs in the cupboard! If Earl Grey doesn’t sound good, I have other blends too. :)

As for my favorite piece in the collection – it will have to be a toss-up between the teapot (because of the acorn-shaped knob on the lid) and the cornucopia:

Thanks for stopping by – it was nice having you. Have a marvelous weekend, everyone!

Won’t you join me…

One of the routines that I personally enjoy tremendously leading up to the holidays is putting up my spring/summer dishes in early October, and switch them out with my fall/holiday dishes.  I like to do this on a day when I am by myself, and enjoy the beauty of the different plates, cups and saucers etc. as I am switching them out.

Now that that is accomplished, and the weather is gradually getting nippy… won’t you join me for a bit of apple crisp (yes, we still haven’t gotten tired of the countless rounds of apple crisp I have been making, hahaha!) accompanied by something hot to drink, served in a fall theme?

Have a wonderful autumn weekend, everyone.  I will be back on Monday!

***

Wiesbaden Napkin Fold

Some of you have asked me to demonstrate how to do this napkin fold:

It is called the “Wiesbaden” because this napkin fold adorns many dining tables in the beautiful resort town of Wiesbaden, Germany (from Linda Hetzer’s The Simply Art of Napkin Folding).

[I find that for the best presentation, you would have to use quality linen that has a bit of a “body” and is not too “limp”, or else your folds won’t stand up as nicely. For the “real” thing, I also press and starch my linen before performing the fold. I also found that a larger fork (Continental size) works and looks best.]

First, fold the napkin in half diagonally to form a triangle:

Fold up the bottom edge about 1-1/2 inches:

From the center, fold three one-inch pleates and insert the pleats in between the tines of the fork. There you have it – Simple, simple, simple!! You may choose to display the napkin with or without that “front” fold depending on from which direction you insert the pleats between the tines:

I hope you have enjoyed this short tutorial, and that it has given you some ideas for your Thanksgiving presentation this year!

Have a great day, everyone!

Autumn Tablescape

To get geared up for the fall season, I am showing you a few of my autumn tablescape pictures. Please keep in mind those pictures were taken before blogging, so you would have to excuse the quality of some (*grin*):

I have truly enjoyed reading the holiday traditions you have left on my giveaway post. I will be sharing between now and the holiday season the different traditions we have at my house – one of which is that we do not serve turkey at any other time during the year except during THANKSGIVING (or maybe Christmas). It makes it all the more special when we walk through the house on Thanksgiving Day and smell the turkey roasting deliciously in the oven!

I wish my bloggy friends in the Northern Hemisphere a very beautiful and safe autumn! Till next time! :)

Click the following links for more autumn tablescapes:

More Autumn Accoutrement

More Autumn Tablescape

Autumn Dessert Presentation

Click here if you are interested in the napkin presentation.

Decorating with Cornucopia

History of Cornucopia excerpted from Wikipedia:

[The cornucopia (Latin: Cornu Copiae) is a symbol of food and abundance dating back to the 5th century BC, also referred to as horn ‘o’ plenty, Horn of Amalthea, and harvest cone

In modern depiction, the cornucopia is typically a hollow, horn-shaped wicker basket typically filled with various kinds of festive fruit and vegetables. In North America, the cornucopia has come to be associated with Thanksgiving and the harvest.]

I have given my cornucopia a slight twist – I filled it with a floral arrangement accented by berries and real pheasant feathers:

This cornucopia is one of my favorite pieces from the Spode Woodland collection. I have had it for quite a few years, and it sometimes stays as a regular fixture in my home decor even beyond the fall/winter seasons. Fall is my husband’s favorite season, and I am always anxious to try out fall things to make the season special for him. The only thing that I am really lacking is a fall-theme quilt — one of these days, I promise myself. :)

Thank you for looking at my cornucopia. I hope you have a bountiful day!

I’m a little teapot…

I anxiously wait for Gracious Hospitality‘s assignment each week to see if it’s something I can participate, and this week’s is on teapots!!! I think I might take a stab at this difficult assignment… :)

I am rarely a mix-and-match person; I think that methodical quirk is the engineer in me. So, the teapots I have purchased are ones that are made for the china collections I have.

If you have been visiting my blog for a while, you would have caught quite a few sightings of this Royal Albert Lady Carlyle teapot. I absolutely love the scrolls and the gold, and of course the bouquets all adeptly incorporated fit the daintily beautiful shape of the teapot. I actually purchased this teapot at a china shop in Gatwick airport during a layover while I was on an overseas trip. I had been looking for the teapot for quite a while then, and was simply delighted to find one at the airport store. Since we were traveling light, I requested the shop ship the teapot back to the States for me – which they did without any mishap! I have received many many compliments from you all on my Lady Carlyle pieces, THANK YOU! If you are interested to see more Lady Carlyle pieces and know a bit about the history, please come back this Friday when I do a Show-and-Tell post on my Lady Carlyle china:

This silver teaset (shown minus the intricate silver scroll work tea tray) is an old set made by Oneida Silversmith. It is a set I use when I am using pieces that don’t have their own matching teapots. Since silver goes with anything and everything, the setting always comes out looking nice:

You have seen these two before. The one on the left is from Taiwan. It’s a gift from a dear friend. It looks to be in a traditional Oriental shape. My father told me that he had seen similar teapots like that when he was growing up. The one on the right is well-beloved by many many many over the generations (since its production in 1814) – the Spode Blue Italian 6-cup teapot. Its regal shape mixed with the blue and white is simply breathtaking to me. I never get tired of looking at it:

I almost forgot about this one because it’s now put up and stored in the cabinet. This teapot is from the Spode Woodland Collection which I only use during the fall. I started the collection in honor of my husband whose favorite season is the fall. I stumbled across just the teapot a few years ago WITHOUT the lid and bought it for $15. I had to place a special order for the lid from Spode, and had to pay close to $50 plus shipping for just the lid! You win some, you lose some, I guess:

Seeing all the beautiful teapots others have posted, I think it’s perhaps time to spread my wings and branch out a bit and buy some teapots that are individual and unique. :) This has been a fun assignment. Thanks, LaTeaDah!