Joining the QUILT FESTIVAL Fun

Amy of Park City Girl is hosting her first annual Quilt Festival, and thought I couldn’t miss out on the fun! “Select your favorite quilt, make sure you have a good picture of it and go post about it! It doesn’t matter what size, style, or era it is from – there’s no judging here :) In your post tell your quilt’s story.”

3437746881_4abcf175e0_m

It’s hard for me to have to pick a favorite quilt because all the projects I have worked on end up being special to me in their own way. The most meaningful quilt I have made, however, is my interpretation of Mrs. Susan Nokes McCord “Harrison’s Rose Urn” (circa 1860) for a wholecloth. This is Mrs. McCord’s quilt:

grouse9

This is my wholecloth interpretation:

grouse1

Both works are in honor of our 9th President, President William Henry Harrison, also the grandfather of President Benjamin Harrison:

grouse10

I added an “H” to the urn as a monogram, and a grouse silhouette to commemorate the President’s favorite past time, grouse-hunting. The President named his house “Grouseland” — that’s how serious about grouse hunting! :)

grouse2

grouse3

You can see the background stippling compared to the size of a penny:

grouse5

The quilt top is a cotton/silk blend, quilted with silk thread over a wool batt. Finished size is about 13 inches square:

grouse4

It won first place in the 2008 Grouseland Festival of Quilts Old Tippecanoe Block Challenge. It is now part of a permanent collection displayed in the Grouseland Mansion. If you are a subscriber to “The Quilter” magazine, you might have also seen it in their March 2009 issue:

grouse15

grouse71

Thank you for stopping by. If this is your first visit, I would like you to stay a bit longer and look at my other favorite quilts. Please leave a comment – that way I can visit you back! Have a lovely day!

Advertisements

Trying something new…

I have been trying out a new background quilting stitch on one of the quilts I am finishing up for “The Quilter” — it is in a much larger scale than what I am normally used to. I think it’s worked out so far except I am not quite sure what to call it — slippery eels, flaming tongues…?

I got a call this morning from “Quiltmaker” that the sweetheart swag feather motif that I had designed for my quilt which appeared in Quiltmaker’s “Quilting & Embroidery” (Summer 2009) Ivory Spring will be included in the Quiltmaker’s Quilting Motif Vol. 7 coming out in November this year. Woo hoo!!!

Thanks for stopping by. I hope you have a splendid day! Till next time! :)

Dish-aholic Part 5: Sucker for Blue Transferware

Hello Everyone – I hope you have had a splendid week.  Over at my end, I am up to my eyeballs in deadlines!  I was going to do a post on more fall tableware, but I just ran out of time.  Instead, I am going to show you just what a sucker I am for Blue Transferware — especially those made by Spode.

This is my “festive” transferware platter – the pattern is officially called “Festival”.  I used to only put it out for the holidays, but I like it so much that I have leave it out all year round.  I just love that majestic look of that turkey, don’t you? :)

This is a Seder or Passover platter that bears the background pattern of antique Jewish filigree.  I am not Jewish, but I have always loved the story of deliverance in the book of Exodus – the things foreshadowed in the event are simply amazing!

This is a smaller platter that shows the “Girl At Well” pattern.  I have always loved this pattern even though this is the only piece I have.   The wholesome beauty of the girl drawing water from the well reminds me of the beauty of serving others:

Soon, it will be the season for this:

***

Meanwhile, these came in the mail today – my blue ribbon from the Grouseland Old Tippecanoe Block Challenge, a certificate, and a hand-written note from the organizers.  While designing the quilt block, I learned that there are more quilts named after President William Harrison than any other Presidents even though he was only in office for 32 days:

Thank you for coming to my show-and-tell.  I wish you an enjoyable weekend!

I WON!!!!

I received the following comment on my Harrison Urn Quilt Block from Jane in Indiana on Friday —

“I had just come home from the Grouseland Quilt Show because I had won a place in the challenge. And wouldn’t you know, it was your block who beat me!! Congratulations on your first place winning in piecework!! I had placed second in piecework, also!! I was, also, blown away at you work. Beautiful!!! I had consequently found your blog a few days ago and saw your block there. I had to go today to see who beat me, and when I saw that it was yours, I wasn’t really that surprised. Your work is wonderful!”

I was excited and surprised and feeling a bit unsure about the news at the time, because I hadn’t heard anything official from the organizers…

Jane assured me that I had indeed won in emails we exchanged later, but still no official word from the organizers…

Then, this afternoon after we returned from church, a message on the answering machine confirmed my FIRST PLACE win in the Pieced Category at the Grouseland Festival of Quilts Old Tippecanoe Block Challenge held in Vincennes, Indiana on October 10th and 11th, 2009. Later in a phone conversation with Judy Morton representing the organizers, I was told that my quilt block will be displayed in Grouseland, with the possibility of being part of a traveling exhibit as well. I was also told that the winning entries will be featured in “The Quilter” magazine. What an honor this is in my short quilting journey!

Right when I was about to publish this post, I received an email from Jane. She went back the following day and took pictures of my block with the blue ribbon (bottom left corner). Jane had won second place in the “Pieced” Category, and first place in the “Applique” Category (top left corner, and bottom middle are Jane’s blocks – stunning!). Thanks bunches, Jane!

As I let the news soak in, I am thankful for many that have encouraged me beyond measure in my quilting journey:

1. My Lord and King – without Him, I am nothing. Indeed, “I said to the LORD, “You are my Lord; apart from you I have no good thing.” (Psalm 16:2)

2. My husband – he was the person who had first planted the bug of “you ought to try sewing” in my ear ever since we were newly married eons ago (well, not that looong!). I was an engineering student at the time and later proceeded to work in the field of Chemical Engineering for about seven years, and had NEVER had any interest to sew in my whole life. Nonetheless, he is always supportive in all my learning opportunities. He certainly was and still is in all my heirloomy pursuits — always with constructive ideas!

3. Barbara – my quilting teacher, mentor, close friend who is also a fellow Jane Austen fan. If it weren’t for her teaching me in my first quilt (which is an applique and pieced quilt, can you believe the naiveté for someone who has never sewn?), I wouldn’t have learned the love of quilting. I tell her that every quilt that gets any recognition is a tribute to her.

4. Annelle – my heirloom sewing teacher who is never discouraging in any way. Sharing our love for heirloom together has been an incredible journey.

5. Dan and Rhonda of Rogers Sewing Center – they have been invaluable to me as friends. They have helped and encouraged me tremendously ever since the day I purchase my machine from them. Through the Sewing Center, I have also made many sweet friends with whom I have forged great friendships. There’s just something when I can talk sewing with another person.

6. My sister – very very different from me, but she is never too busy to stop and oooh-and-aaah about anything I make!

7. I am certainly thankful to the bloggy friends I have made through this blog. Thank you for your ever encouraging words about my work. Your comments often brighten my day while I take my breaks from working at my sewing machine. I always make a point to respond to every comment either by email or visiting you on your blog if you have one.

A “grouse-y” sort of Wholecloth!

The Grouseland Foundation issued a Block Challenge (the 2008 Old Tippecanoe Block Challenge) in honor of the 9th President of the United States, President William Henry Harrison. All entries will become the property of Grouseland for use in exhibits and to commemorate the Battle of Tippecanoe in 2011:

Grouseland (the President’s home) was named after the grouse President Harrison enjoyed hunting:

Inspired by the historic quilt “Harrison Rose Urn” by Mrs. Susan Nokes McCord (circa 1860),

I came up with my own version that is adapted for wholecloth, simply named “Harrison Urn”. It was quilted with silk thread over cotton/silk quilt top and wool batt:

The urn bears an “H” for President Harrison:

The silhouette of a grouse is quilted to remember his hobby and Grouseland:

This is an interesting shot from when the quilt was still wet from having the fabric markings removed:

Showing the scale of my background stippling against a penny that is between 1/16″ – 1/8″ apart:

I have always been keen on historically-related events. So, I thought by entering the block, I did my little part in learning and remembering the rich history of this nation.

Similarity

The study of historical art motif is very fascinating to me. Oftentimes one finds the same motif being replicated and adapted for different media.

This is from a set of French made dishes someone had given me for everyday use. I like the Toile de Jouy look. I never thought anything of it except for the fact that they are beautiful and that they are extremely durable:

… until I saw these designs in a book entitling “Historic Floral and Animal Designs for Embroiderers and Craftsmen” by Suzanne E. Chapman. These are patterns of Argentan laces from the 18th century. The first picture depicts a lace pattern worn by Queen Charlotte on her marriage to King George III on Sept 8, 1761:

Argentan lace is a type of needle lace (worked with a needle and thread popular in the 17th and 18th century. According to Britannica online, it was made at the French town of Argentan from the 17th century, when Louis XIV’s minister Jean-Baptiste Colbert founded the lace industry. Characteristic of this lace is a net background consisting of a large hexagonal mesh, the six sides of which are worked over with buttonhole stitching. Absolutely fascinating to me!

While we are on the subject of history, Queen Charlotte was the queen of England while the American Revolutionary War was going on. Though rather “plain-faced”, she remained the devoted wife of King George III. She bore him 15 children, thirteen of whom reached adulthood. She was an avid fan of fine arts, and had Johann Christian Bach (youngest son of JS Bach) as her music teacher. Her contemporaries might have considered her “plain-faced”, you can see her queenly attire is anything but plain. Of course, her royal status is unmistakable by the badger-skin coat that is draped over the chair in the foreground of that portrait:

Filled with amazement of being able to connect these few dots in history, I started looking around the house to see if I could connect a few more dots, and saw this on a Portuguese Matelasse coverlet:

The pattern isn’t exactly as elaborate as the Argentan lace, but there is definitely some faint similarity going on there. Fascinating, isn’t it? Does your heart beat with excitement like mine whenever I discover yet another historical gem? Hahaha…

To date I have adapted on paper the lace pattern worn by Queen Charlotte for a wholecloth quilt. All I am lacking now is time… where and how could one find some extra time?!

UPDATE: Song of Williamsburg

The “Song of Williamsburg” pattern is now available for purchase. This is a fun and rather quick project for free-motion quilting, especially if you have the BSR (Bernina Stitch Regulator). Since I am a quilter as well as needleworker, the motif was designed with the idea that it can also be used for embroidery, crewel, or even shadow work.

Have been a city girl, I now have the fortunate opportunity to live closer to the “country”. Hopefully one day, I would be able to move to the real countryside. Nonetheless, I have learned to appreciate my friends with wings that would perch on my deck rails or come to say hi at the window in my informal dining area. Because of my growing fascination with birds, I am working on a series of bird motifs for heirloom quilting. Watch for my next “Flying Beauty” pattern to come within a month or two!

Happy Crafting, Everyone!

Song of Williamsburg

The wholecloth-style quilting is one of my favorite kinds of quilting because one could really showcase some dense and beautiful feather quilting motifs.

Now that it’s completed, I am pleased to show you “Song of Williamsburg”. Was this like anything you had imagined when you read Border Smart a few days ago? The quilting motif in the center cotton sateen block is original and was inspired by an 18th century bird bottle found in Colonial America.

The entire quilt is quilted with silk thread. You can see from the closeup shot that I had added some French knots for added interest to the piece.


I wish you a beautiful and blessed day, brightened by bird-ly songs!

p.s. The pattern of the quilting motif will be available for purchase some time next week.