Dishaholic Part 3: All things historic

Working on my grouse-y quilt made me all warm and fuzzy about all things historic. So for my show-and-tell today, I thought I would show you some dishes that have historic connections:

The pattern is called “Mandarin Bouquet”, a Winterthur adaptation made by Mottahedeh. The Fitzhugh border, named after an English family, was selected by George Washington for his dinner service at Mount Vernon. Spode has had a Fitzhugh line of china service in the past. The bouquet motif is from a Chinese Export porcelain punch bowl (circa 1800). I love the vibrant colors of the bouquet – I would love to interpret it for an applique quilt some day:

It all started with the lobed dish that is in front of the oval platter (in the first picture). I had received it a few years ago as a graduation gift. Over time, my husband has added the pieces occasionally as Christmas and anniversary gifts. It is not a collection that I have ferociously added myself because I think it makes it more special when my husband adds to the collection for me.

I thought I would show you some George Washington related items around the house while we are on the subject of all things historic…

A lovely coffee table book of Mount Vernon that showcases the Washington estate in various seasons:

A framed menu from the Mount Vernon Inn:

My favorite book on Washington, written by George Washington Custis, his adopted son (who happened to be the original owner of the Arlington):

The favorite Washington print in our family:

A couple of small prints issued by the Mount Vernon Ladies Association:

And finally, a few scenes of Mount Vernon:

I hope you have enjoyed my “historic” show and tell. Have yourself a very merry weekend!



Decorative Details: Part 2

(Subtitle: How does a dish-aholic incorporate what she collects in her home decor?)

4. Plates

Plates in china cabinets:

Plate on the wall:

Plates on window sill:

Plates on kitchen counter:

Plates on bathroom counters:

Plates just as equally important as books in bookcase:

Plates on fireplate mantel:

Plates atop doorway:

Plates on wall sconces:

The top of the piano definitely doesn’t escape the sprinkling of plates from the dish-aholic (even if it’s just a silver bread plate!):

And… what does the crazy dishaholic lady do with the extra plates? Why, she uses them as receptacles for jar candles (of course!):

Plates, plates, plates everywhere – such is the motto of a dish-aholic’s decorating style!

p.s.  Click here if you have missed part 1.