Recreating Antique Quilts Project Highlight #1: Re-interpreting a DAR Baltimore Quilt

Hello Friends, I hope you are well!  I have been working hard to resist the temptation to just dig a hole in the ground and hibernate until the weather gets a little warmer.  It’s been bitterly cold where I am.  I think I am just a wimp when it comes to weather.

One of my Recreating Antique Quilts projects that has been warmly received is Ivory Baltimore.

My quilty inspirations of this little 17″ x 21″ banner consist traditional French red/white monochromatic needlework sampler and the Quaker medallion sampler.  You would often see stitchery of red on cream or white in French monochromatic samplers, such as the one I had stitched years ago.

So in the case of Ivory Baltimore, I reversed the colors, and have my cream applique shapes stitched onto a red and coral background.  The applique is adapted from a DAR Baltimore Album quilt. A picture of the original quilt is included in the book.

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Drawing from antique Quaker samplers, where sometimes only the “half” motifs were stitched on the outside perimeter of the samplers, I took one of the blocks in the original DAR and only appliqued half of the block on the left side of the banner.  (I so need to get this sampler completed!)

Thus the “half” Baltimore album block in Ivory Baltimore.

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I used Aurifil Mako 50 cotton thread for everything – piecing, buttonhole stitching around the applique shapes, and quilting (of course!).  I cannot stress enough how much I love using Aurifil threads – my machine loves it, I love it, and my finished projects love it!  The batting I used is Hobbs Tuscany Wool batting because I really wanted my feathers to show around the applique shapes.  Of course, I quilt 99.99% of my quilts with batting made by Hobbs because much is considered before they bring something to the market.

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Of course, I will be working with some ladies in making Ivory Baltimore in Rogers, Arkansas. Click here for contact information to see if spots are still available for the class.  One thing I can tell you is that Dan and Rhonda and I are working hard to get things all ready for a really fun time in April with the participants!  Click here if you haven’t read about how Dan bailed me out from trouble two weeks ago.  Anyway, since my public appearances are very limited due to my family obligations, I do hope to see some of you at the event!

Ivory Baltimore is a versatile project.  I would love to see you recreate antique quilts your way!

1.  You can easily just take the urn block and repeat it for 9 blocks for a nice sized wall hanging. How about alternative the color scheme for the blocks – cream applique on red background fabric, and red applique on cream background fabric.

2.  You can just as easily mirror image the half block to make it a whole block and use just that for another banner.

3.  How about using other colors… cream on gray background, orange on a black background, cream on mocha background!

4.  How about repeat the urn block three or four times horizontally for a table runner project?

5.  Now, the templates in the book are printed at 100% to reflect the final size of the book project. But you can easily enlarge the urn block and use that to make pillow shams to dress up your bed!

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Thank you for stopping by!  Tell me what your thoughts are regarding Ivory Baltimore. Meanwhile, you can read all about the book here.  It’s time for me to crawl back in bed go back to work. Tootles for now.

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3 thoughts on “Recreating Antique Quilts Project Highlight #1: Re-interpreting a DAR Baltimore Quilt

  1. I like that “sampler” sampler. Makes more sense in some ways.

    If you decided to go dig that hole in weather like you are describing, it is going to be tough going. I was out with a walking tour this AM for 3 hrs in not-quite freezing fog (it has been in the low 50’s for several days earlier in the week), and I still feel like a popsicle!

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